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Ibalon (Three Heroes of the Bicol Epic)

16 Jul

When the hero Baltog came to the rich land of Ibalon, many monsters still roamed around in its very dark forest. Baltog, born in Baltavara to the brave clan of Lipod, was the first to cultivate the fields in the rich land of Ibalon.
2 Then the Tandayag attacked and destroyed Baltog‘s fields and crops. The Tandayag was a monstrous wild boar but the hero Baltog was not afraid. One night, he waited for the Tandayag and wrestled with it with all his might. The Tandayag had very long fangs. The earth shook at the Tandayag‘s step. But Baltog was strong and brave. He was able to pin down the monstrous wild boar and tear out its mouth.
3 Baltog carried the Tandayag and hung it on a talisay tree in front of his house in Tondol. The people celebrated when they learned of the victory of their king Baltog. The clans of Panicuason and Asog came over to marvel at the monstrous wild boar in Ibalon.
4 At that time the hero Handiong came with a band of warriors to the land of Ibalon. Handiong and his men had to fight thousands of battles, and face many dangers to defeat the monsters. They first fought the one-eyed giants in the land of Ponon. They fought without rest for ten months until all the one-eyed giants were killed.
5 They went to the lair of the giant flying fishes called Tiburon which had slimy, scaly, and hardy flesh and sawlike teeth that could crush rocks. Handiong and his men did not stop until they vanquished every Tiburon.
6 They tamed the fierce tamaraws. They drove away the giant Sarimaw which was larger than an elephant and very fierce. They used their spears and arrows to kill all the crocodiles which were bigger than boats. The savage monkeys were frightened and hid when they
saw the rivers and swamps of Ibalon turn red with blood.
7 Oriol was the hardest to kill. A serpent with a beautiful voice, Oriol could change its image to deceive enemies. Oriol had escaped every trap and disappeared.
8 All by himself, Handiong looked for Oriol in the heart of the forest. He followed the beautiful voice and was almost enchanted by it in his pursuit. It is said that Oriol admired Handiong‘s bravery and gallantry. Thus, the serpent taught the hero how to conquer the monsters until peace came to the whole Ibalon.
9 Handiong built a town in Isarog and a season of progress followed. Under Handiong‘s leadership, the people planted rice which they named after him. He built the first boat to ride the waves of Ibalon seas. Because of his good example, inventors came forth from his people. Ginantong made the plow, harrow, and other farming tools. Hablom invented the first loom for weaving abaca clothes. Dinahon, an Aeta, created the stove, cooking pot, earthen jar, and other kitchen utensils. The brilliant Sural thought of the alphabet and started to write on white rock. It was a golden period in Ibalon when even slaves were respected under the laws of Handiong.
10 But there came the big flood freed by Unos, with earthquakes and the eruption of the volcanoes of Hantik, Kolasi, and Isarog. Rivers dried up and the seas receded. The earth parted, mountains sank, and many towns in Ibalon were destroyed.
11 Then appeared the giant Rabot, half-man half-beast, with terrible powers.

Bantong, Handiong‘s good friend, was ordered to kill the new monster in Ibalon. He took with him a thousand warriors to attack Rabot‘s den. Bantong used his wisdom against Rabot. He did not attack the giant‘s den right away but instead observed Rabot‘s ways. He saw many rocks around the den. They were people turned into rock by Rabot.
13 He also learned that Rabot loved to sleep. When Rabot slept very soundly, Bantong was able to go near him. The giant died with a single stab by the brave and wise Bantong. Ibalon was at peace once more.

 

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15 Comments

Posted by on July 16, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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15 responses to “Ibalon (Three Heroes of the Bicol Epic)

  1. stephen

    July 25, 2012 at 11:40 am

    MAM KASAMA PO BA TO SA PORTFOLIO
    [JESSHEN05] THE BEST

     
  2. misty angel

    November 13, 2012 at 5:39 pm

    naks

     
  3. Chuchay

    December 2, 2012 at 1:57 pm

    nice!!!!

     
  4. budji Tresvalles

    February 13, 2013 at 4:51 pm

    Hello Blog Owner,

    I am currently doing a research paper on this particular folk-myth “Ibalon”.
    1. The matter I would like to know is, if this particular Bicolano folklore is being already taught or a part of the curriculum in the primary or high-school.
    2. I also would like to know particular school using your blog.

    I would greatly appreciate a feedback from you. Please email me at budji3tres@gmail.com

    Thank you very much,
    Budji T.

     
    • jhayelie

      February 18, 2013 at 4:52 pm

      yes, the story of Ibalon is included in the k-12curriculum used by grade 7.

      my blog is not really used by my school,i just post the texts for easier access, and I don’t have any claims on the texts. people all around the country is just stumbling on my blog when they search for the texts.

       
  5. jan wesley alipio

    June 10, 2013 at 5:49 pm

    pati na rin po pala yung Indarapatra and Sulayman

     
  6. Red

    August 21, 2013 at 11:18 am

    Hello po, I would like to acknowledge that I will use your blog as my reference to my project in Literature. Your summary of the epic is very clear and easy to understand. Thanks po.

     
    • jhayelie

      August 22, 2013 at 11:57 am

      uhm, all of the literature here are from the DepEd’s Learning Package for the Grade 7, as well as the summaries. if the site were not mentioned in the last part it means i got it from the LP. these are the literature that we study under the k-12 program and i would appreciate it if you quote it as a source instead of my blog. but thank you for dropping by! :)

       
  7. Ksantie

    October 10, 2013 at 9:11 am

    jhaylie i would like to ask for your permission about this story, im going to use it in our study…
    don’t worry i will acknowledge you for borrowing this stuff. Thank you. :)

     
    • jhayelie

      October 12, 2013 at 3:23 pm

      uhm, it’s not really mine to begin with. pls. credit the authors and then DepEd…and the write-shoppers of k-12 English.Just put up this blog to help students find the stories for their assignments :)

       
      • dhanrize

        November 12, 2013 at 11:31 am

        hi!!! :D

         
  8. michael hazelitte n. san juan

    February 5, 2014 at 6:51 pm

    it’s beatiful

     
  9. reden

    July 1, 2014 at 4:57 pm

    oo nga ayn yan

     

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